Secret court OKs continued US phone surveillance - WSLS 10 NBC in Roanoke/Lynchburg Va

Secret court OKs continued US phone surveillance

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This Sept. 19, 2007, file photo, shows the National Security Agency building at Fort Meade, Md. The government is secretly collecting the telephone records of millions of U.S. customers of Verizon under a top-secret court order. This Sept. 19, 2007, file photo, shows the National Security Agency building at Fort Meade, Md. The government is secretly collecting the telephone records of millions of U.S. customers of Verizon under a top-secret court order.
WASHINGTON -

A secret U.S. intelligence court renewed an order Friday to continue forcing Verizon Communications to turn over hundreds of millions of telephone records to the government each day in its search for foreign terror or espionage suspects.
    
The order by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court has been in place for years but must be renewed every three months. It was exposed in June after former National Security Agency systems analyst Edward Snowden leaked details of two top secret U.S. surveillance programs that critics say violate privacy rights.
    
The order was set to expire Friday, and its renewal shows that the Obama administration and the court of 11 federal judges stand behind its legality.
    
In a statement, the office of National Intelligence Director James Clapper said it was confirming the Verizon renewal as part of an ongoing effort to make more information about the recently declassified programs as public as possible.
    
Clapper "has decided to declassify and disclose publicly that the government filed an application with the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court seeking renewal of the authority to collect telephony metadata in bulk, and that the court renewed that authority," the statement said.
    
The two programs, both run by the NSA, pick up millions of telephone and Internet records that are routed through American networks each day. Intelligence officials say they have helped disrupt dozens of terrorist attacks, and target only foreign suspects outside the United States while taking close care not to look at the content of conversations or messages by American citizens.
    
But they have raised sharp concerns about whether the U.S. is improperly - or even illegally - snooping on people at home and abroad.
    
Other major U.S. telephone carriers are similarly ordered to give records of their customers' calls to the NSA, which also is able to reach into the data streams of U.S. companies such as Yahoo, Facebook Inc., Microsoft Corp., Google Inc. and others, and grab emails, video chats, pictures and more. The technology companies say they turn over information only if required by court order.
    
Snowden has been charged with espionage and is seeking asylum from several countries, including Russia. He has been holed up for three weeks in a transit zone at Moscow's international airport since arriving from Hong Kong, and Russian customs inspectors say they do not have jurisdiction to seize him.
    
At a discussion earlier Friday touching on privacy and security, DNI counsel Robert Litt maintained that "these programs are legal" because they are authorized by Congress, the courts and the White House. He said their exposure could curb the government's ability to detect threats against the U.S.
    
"Only time will tell the full extent of the damage caused by the unlawful disclosures of these lawful programs," Litt said.
 

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