NORTH CAROLINA: McCrory to sign bill to repeal Common Core - WSLS 10 NBC in Roanoke/Lynchburg Va

McCrory to sign bill to repeal Common Core

Posted: Updated:
RALEIGH, N.C. -

Gov. Pat McCrory said Wednesday that he plans to sign a bill repealing Common Core, the National standards for education that have drawn the ire of Republicans in many states.

The state House voted Wednesday to repeal the state's K-12 standards after about 10 minutes of debate during which Democrats argued the move was political in nature.

"Is this really to better education or is it more political in nature?" asked Rep. Tricia Ann Cotham (D-Mecklenburg). "I worry this is more political."

Wednesday afternoon, McCrory said he plans to sign the legislation, which directs the state board of education to come up with new education standard. A new standards advisory commission would be formed to make recommendations to the board.

Common Core, which schools began testing two years ago, would remain in place until the new standards are completed.

"I will sign this bill because it does not change any of North Carolina’s education standards," McCrory said. "It does initiate a much-needed, comprehensive and thorough review of standards. No standards will change without the approval of the State Board of Education. I especially look forward to the recommendations that will address testing issues so we can measure what matters most for our teachers, parents and students."

The House moved swiftly to adopt a conference committee report and approved the measure 71-34. House Republicans called the Common Core standards "a laughing stock."

"This program, in many quarters of the country, is a laughing stock," Rep. Michael Speciale (R-Craven) said. "We need to get rid of it -- it's not a partisan issue."

The Senate has already approved the measure. The chambers had competing bills on how to alter the state's curriculum, but found a compromise that used some Common Core material.

The bill "melds the two versions quite well," Rep. Craig Horn, R-Union told the Associated Press. "We are not taking anything off the table from the standpoint of being able to access the best ideas in the country to ensure that we have high academic standards."

Common Core was developed by governors and school leaders and was approved in more than 40 states.

"The bottom line is it's a terrible system there may be some good things about it and though this bill will allow them to sue those things if they need to," Speciale said. "It's not something we should have ever accepted."

But Rep. Tricia Cotham, D-Mecklenburg, called the move political. "Why are we really doing this?" she said. "Is this really to better education or is this more political in nature? I worry that this is more political."

Some teachers, however, worry that lawmakers are ill-informed about Common Core.

"I'm not sure how they can jump on this bandwagon of trying to get rid of it when they haven't been in classrooms or haven't looked at lesson plans or talked to teachers and students about what they'll be learning," Kristin Beller.

As a fourth grade teacher, Beller worries about the cost of developing new standards.

"What they are doing by elongating this process is just wasting away money that could be used for our classrooms," Beller argued.

REACTION TO THE DECISION

"Today, North Carolina confirmed its commitment to high levels of learning that prepare each student with critical thinking and problem solving skills for the workplaces of tomorrow. This is a significant step toward a reasonable approach to make standards higher and our top priority is pushing for the absolute best academic standards for the state. North Carolina will move forward with implementing higher standards in classrooms, preserving the hard work of our teachers and students who have been implementing these higher standards in their classrooms for more than three years."

- Lew Ebert, president and CEO of the North Carolina Chamber.

RELATED ARTICLES
Copyright 2014 WNCN. All rights reserved.
  • Trending StoriesTrending StoriesMore>>

  • 2 charged with first-degree murder in beating death of UNC professor, cancer researcher

    2 charged with first-degree murder in beating death of UNC professor, cancer researcher

    Friday, July 25 2014 9:00 AM EDT2014-07-25 13:00:14 GMT
    A UNC research professor was robbed and beaten to death Wednesday afternoon on University Drive in Chapel Hill, police said.
    A UNC research professor was robbed and beaten to death Wednesday afternoon on University Drive in Chapel Hill, police said.
  • Woman impales herself on cemetery fence; says she was running from attacker

    Woman impales herself on cemetery fence; says she was running from attacker

    Wednesday, July 23 2014 2:53 PM EDT2014-07-23 18:53:18 GMT
    A woman claims she was running from an attacker and tried to jump a five foot fence when she became impaled. Firefighters had to use power saws and a grinding saw to cut her free, all while she was conscious. After 30 minutes she was transported to an area hospital for surgery to remove the spike sticking out of her thigh. It happened at Vine Cemetery in Hazleton. She said the nearest gate was locked. Witnesses backed...
    A woman claims she was running from an attacker and tried to jump a five foot fence when she became impaled. Firefighters had to use power saws and a grinding saw to cut her free, all while she was conscious. After 30 minutes she was transported to an area hospital for surgery to remove the spike sticking out of her thigh. It happened at Vine Cemetery in Hazleton. She said the nearest gate was locked. Witnesses backed...
  • Man charged with killing UNC professor had just left Wake Jail

    Man charged with killing UNC professor had just left Wake Jail

    Friday, July 25 2014 7:14 PM EDT2014-07-25 23:14:57 GMT
    Derick Davis II, 23 (Left) and Troy Arrington, Jr., 27, (Right)Derick Davis II, 23 (Left) and Troy Arrington, Jr., 27, (Right)
    An Orange County dispatcher sounded shocked Wednesday afternoon when a 911 caller described finding University of North Carolina professor Feng Liu beaten and dying on a street near the UNC campus.
    An Orange County dispatcher sounded shocked Wednesday afternoon when a 911 caller described finding University of North Carolina professor Feng Liu beaten and dying on a street near the UNC campus.
Powered by WorldNow

WSLS 10, P.O. Box 10
Roanoke, VA 24022-0010

Telephone: 540.981.9110
Fax: 540.343.3157
Email: news@wsls.com

Can't find something?
Powered by WorldNow
All content © Copyright 2000 - 2014 Media General Communications Holdings, LLC. A Media General Company.