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Longest tenured worker in Danville Community College history to retire after 47 years

Reynolds began working at college in September 1970

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DANVILLE, Va. – Nancy Taylor Reynolds witnessed the transformation of the Danville Community College campus for nearly half a century.

After 47 years and 10 months, as of July 1, she will retire from her job with the college.

Reynolds transitioned from being a student at the college to a graduate to an employee over a matter of weeks nearly 48 years ago.

“My mother used to tell people that I went to DCC and never left,” Reynolds said with a laugh.

Nancy Taylor Reynolds, pictured second from right, standing, poses with her section of Danville Community College’s graduates from the secretarial science program in 1970. Reynolds took a job with DCC two weeks after graduating and will retire on July 1, 2018, having spent nearly half a decade at the college.
Nancy Taylor Reynolds, pictured second from right, standing, poses with her section of Danville Community College’s graduates from the secretarial science program in 1970. Reynolds took a job with DCC two weeks after graduating and will retire on July 1, 2018, having spent nearly half a decade at the college.

Born and raised in Pittsylvania County,  Reynolds in 1970 from the college’s secretarial science program, which is now called administrative support technology. 

Her first position at DCC was answering the switchboard and helping out in the admissions, counseling and president’s offices.

When the college’s financial aid office was first launched, she became the administrative assistant while one of the counselors, John McRae, became the director.

Her next position -- the one from which she will retire next month -- was in the office of the vice president of financial and administrative services.

Reynolds said that her love for her job is what has motivated her to come to work every day for nearly 48 years.

When asked what advice she would offer to anyone getting started with their career, Reynolds said to work hard and look for opportunities to grow professionally.

“Be a dedicated employee. Don’t look for shortcuts or the easy way out,” she said. “Take advantage of seminars and workshops. Try to learn new things constantly.”


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