No need to wipe down groceries or takeout, experts say, but do wash your hands

In this March 29, 2020, photo, Regina Summers hands out hot meals donated by Clydes Restaurant Group and distributed by volunteers coordinating with Martha's Table in southeast Washington. Neighborhood deliveries are part of a new Martha's Table initiative, along with community partners, to get needed food directly to the neighborhoods they serve. These volunteers are the tip of the spear for a grassroots community effort to keep Washington's poorest neighborhoods fed during the unprecedented coronavirus crisis which has nearly shut down the American economy. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
In this March 29, 2020, photo, Regina Summers hands out hot meals donated by Clydes Restaurant Group and distributed by volunteers coordinating with Martha's Table in southeast Washington. Neighborhood deliveries are part of a new Martha's Table initiative, along with community partners, to get needed food directly to the neighborhoods they serve. These volunteers are the tip of the spear for a grassroots community effort to keep Washington's poorest neighborhoods fed during the unprecedented coronavirus crisis which has nearly shut down the American economy. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

CNN – Has wiping down your groceries and take-out food become part of your coronavirus survival kit?

It might be time to reconsider, experts say, especially if that extra effort is adding to your daily stress. Even the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is re-emphasizing there's no real risk of getting the virus that causes Covid-19 that way.

"We want to assure you there is currently NO evidence of human or animal food or food packaging being associated with transmission of the #COVID19," the agency tweeted recently.

Jamie Lloyd-Smith is one of the scientists who worked on the only study to analyze how long SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19, might remain on various surfaces.

Despite the fact his research found the virus might live on cardboard for up to 24 hours and metal and plastic for two to three days, Lloyd-Smith doesn’t bother to wipe down his own groceries or takeout.

"I don't, personally," Lloyd-Wright said. "I treat my hands as potentially contaminated while I'm handling the groceries and unpacking them and I make sure that I wash them fully when I'm done with that process."

Virologist Dr. John Williams, who has studied coronaviruses for decades, is also not overly concerned.

“Personally, we’re alternating cooking food at home and getting takeout food for a houseful of kids home from college right now,” Williams said. “And we’re not wiping down the containers from the restaurant.”