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How Virginia is working to protect your vote in the upcoming election

In this June 9, 2020 file photo, people wait to vote in the Georgia's primary election at Park Tavern in Atlanta.  Twice delayed because of the coronavirus pandemic, Georgias primary earlier this year became a poster child for election dysfunction.  Election officials say they are making sweeping changes to try to avoid a repeat in November, as Georgia emerges as a potential presidential battleground, turnout is expected to set records and the coronavirus continues to rage. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)
In this June 9, 2020 file photo, people wait to vote in the Georgia's primary election at Park Tavern in Atlanta. Twice delayed because of the coronavirus pandemic, Georgias primary earlier this year became a poster child for election dysfunction. Election officials say they are making sweeping changes to try to avoid a repeat in November, as Georgia emerges as a potential presidential battleground, turnout is expected to set records and the coronavirus continues to rage. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

Virginia election officials tell us so far, so good when it comes to problems.

They have not seen any attempts to hack into databases before the 2020 election, and they say hackers did look for weaknesses in Virginia’s election websites four years ago, but they made changes.

Virginia Elections Commissioner Christopher Piper says it’s not possible for votes to be changed.

Three years ago Virginia ordered all remaining touch screen electronic voting machines to be taken out of service. You now fill out a paper ballot and slide it into a scanner.

“None of our voting equipment, the scanners that you put your ballots through, none of those are ever connected to the internet. So there’s no chance for those to be hacked from an outside source,” said Piper

The only thing connected to the internet is the voter rolls.