Recruiting foster parents proves difficult due to coronavirus

Empty nesters, same-sex couples and single people can foster and adopt

Misconceptions about adopting and foster care
Misconceptions about adopting and foster care

ROANOKE, Va. – Hundreds of kids age out of foster care without being adopted, meaning they don’t have a family to spend the holidays with or turn to for advice when they need it.

Recruiting foster parents is always difficult, but now it’s even harder because of the pandemic and having to balance changes with schooling.

“There are some external factors that we have no control over such as education. We have families that will work full-time jobs. You don’t have to be a stay-at-home parent to be a foster parent, and now folks have to navigate ‘How am I going to be a full-time employee at my job and also be a part-time or full-time educator for a child that’s placed in my home that’s completing Virtual School?,’” said Emily Moore, a DePaul Community Resources Regional Recruiter.

DePaul Community Resources and other local agencies want to screen people in, not screen people out.

There are basic requirements to be a foster parent, but how much money you make and your age don’t usually matter as long as you can support your family.

You could be empty nesters and still foster and adopt. You also be single or a heterosexual or same-sex married couple.

We have a list of frequently asked questions here.

If you have additional questions about foster care/adoption, contact DePaul Community Resources here.


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