Police: FedEx shooter legally bought guns used in shooting

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Rep. Andre Carson, D-Ind., speaks with members of the Sikh Coalition at the Sikh Satsang of Indianapolis in Indianapolis, Saturday, April 17, 2021 for a commemoration of the victims of the shooting at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis that claimed the lives of several members of the Sikh community. A gunman killed and wounded several people before taking his own life in a late-night attack at a FedEx facility near the Indianapolis airport. (AP Photo/AJ Mast)

INDIANAPOLIS – The former employee who shot and killed eight people at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis legally bought the two rifles used in the attack despite red flag laws designed to prevent such purchases, police said.

A trace of the two guns found by investigators at the scene revealed that suspect Brandon Scott Hole, 19, of Indianapolis, legally bought the rifles last July and September, officials with the Indianapolis police said Saturday.

The police did not say where Hole bought what they described as “assault rifles,” citing the ongoing investigation, but said he was seen using both rifles during the shooting.

Details about the weapons' make, model and caliber won't be released until the investigation is complete, said Genae Cook, a spokesperson for the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department.

Authorities said Hole shot and killed eight people, four of them from the city's Sikh community, at the FedEx facility late Thursday before killing himself.

The FBI said agents had questioned Hole last year after his mother called police to say her son might commit “suicide by cop.” Officers seized a pump-action shotgun from Hole’s home after responding to the call, according to a police report. Police said the gun was never returned to him.

Republican Sen. Todd Young called Sunday for more mental health services across all level of governments.

“We know that we have a Hoosier family who cried out for help, knowing they had a child who required mental health treatment. We know we have members of our law enforcement community who, for a period of time, responded to that call for help. And we know that in the end, that wasn’t enough,” he told The Associated Press before addressing a gathering at the Gurdwara Sikh Satsang, a Sikh house of worship on the east side of Indianapolis.