5 questions heading into Tuesday's Democratic primaries

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Students chant during the Bernie 2020 March to Early Vote at Florida International University to on Wednesday, March 11, 2020, in Miami. Florida and its 219 delegates could be the knockout punch for presidential hopeful Bernie Sanders after a dismal showing in the Michigan primary. The Florida primary election next Tuesday will be closely watched by people across the nation. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

Four states had been scheduled to hold Democratic presidential primaries on Tuesday amid a global outbreak of the novel coronavirus, but leaders in Ohio called off their election, citing public health concerns. Arizona, Illinois and Florida say they're going ahead with plans to vote. Here are five questions ahead of voting:

WILL THE ELECTIONS TAKE PLACE?

Nothing is certain in the age of the coronavirus. Three states scheduled to vote after Tuesday postponed their primaries. Ohio scrapped its Tuesday vote, while Arizona, Florida and Illinois vowed to push ahead.

Voting clusters large numbers of people at polling stations often staffed by volunteers and older workers, exactly the dynamic medical experts want to avoid right now. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders on Sunday suggested delaying Tuesday's votes. And on Monday night, Ohio's Republican Gov. Mike DeWine agreed. The state's health director declared a health emergency and ordered the polls closed.

For most people, the new coronavirus causes only mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough. For some, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia. The vast majority of people recover from the new virus.

WHO WILL VOTE?

With voting still on in some states, who turns out? Turnout has surged in recent Democratic contests as a wave of suburban voters helped catapult former Vice President Joe Biden to his solid lead in the race.

All of the states allow early voting, so there is a good chance that many people cast ballots remotely by mail. Still, it wouldn't be a surprise if turnout drops significantly.