White House report blasts Chinese 'malign activities'

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In this Wednesday, May 20, 2020, photo, Chinese police stand guard in front of Tiananmen Gate in Beijing. This year's version of China's biggest political meeting of the year will be unlike any other. Delayed from March because of the then-spiraling coronavirus outbreak, the decision to go ahead with the gathering signals a partial return to normalcy in the country where the pandemic first broke out. "Partial" being the operative word: The congress will be far from normal. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

WASHINGTON – Beyond its hard-hitting rhetoric against China over its handling of the coronavirus, the White House has issued a broad-scale attack on Beijing's predatory economic policies, military buildup, disinformation campaigns and human rights violations.

The 20-page report does not signal a shift in U.S. policy, according to a senior administration official, who was not authorized to publicly discuss the report and spoke only on the condition of anonymity, but it expands on President Donald Trump's get-tough rhetoric that he hopes will resonate with voters angry about China's handling of the disease outbreak, which has left tens of millions of Americans out of work.

“The media’s focus on the current pandemic risks missing the bigger picture of the challenge that’s presented by the Chinese Communist Party,” Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Wednesday before the White House released its report.

“China’s been ruled by a brutal, authoritarian regime, a communist regime since 1949. For several decades, we thought the regime would become more like us — through trade, scientific exchanges, diplomatic outreach, letting them in the World Trade Organization as a developing nation. That didn’t happen,” he said. “We greatly underestimated the degree to which Beijing is ideologically and politically hostile to free nations. The whole world is waking up to that fact.”

Later in the day, the State Department announced that it had approved the sale of advanced torpedoes to the Taiwanese military, a move sure to draw a rebuke from Beijing, which regards the island as a renegade province. The department said it had informed Congress of the $180 million sale of heavy-weight torpedoes, spare parts, support and testing equipment, which “will help improve the security of (Taiwan) and assist in maintaining political stability, military balance, and economic progress in the region.”

While pushing back on China, Trump has sometimes uttered contradictory statements. He has talked about having a great personal relationship with Chinese President Xi Jinping yet has repeatedly denounced China for not doing more to stop the virus from spreading across the world. He'll criticize China, then say he wants Beijing to sign Phase II of a trade deal and join the United States and Russia in a three-way nuclear arms control treaty.

Late Wednesday, Trump wrote on Twitter that China's "massive disinformation campaign" is intended to help Joe Biden win the 2020 presidential election.

In the past 20 years, the U.S. believed that if it opened its markets wider, invested more money in China and provided greater access to top U.S. technology and training for Chinese military officers that somehow this would cause China to liberalize, the official said.