EXPLAINER: What does Japan's virus state of emergency mean

People wearing face masks to help curb the spread of the coronavirus walk towards a train station in Tokyo on Friday, April 23, 2021. (AP Photo/Hiro Komae)
People wearing face masks to help curb the spread of the coronavirus walk towards a train station in Tokyo on Friday, April 23, 2021. (AP Photo/Hiro Komae) (Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

TOKYO – Japan on Friday declared a state of emergency to curb a rapid coronavirus resurgence, the third since the pandemic began. The measures in parts of Japan, including Tokyo, have so far failed to curb infections caused by a more contagious new variant of the virus.

Here's a look at how the state of emergency differs from previous ones, what measures are included, and whether Japan can control infections before the Tokyo Olympics in July.

HOW BAD IS JAPAN’S SITUATION?

Japan, with about 550,000 cases and fewer than 10,000 deaths, is better off than much of the world, though not so good when compared with other places in Asia. It has not imposed any hard lockdowns. Infections briefly dipped in March, but have since risen above five times to exceed 5,000 Wednesday. Experts have warned that a new variant of the virus, detected earlier in Britain, is rapidly spreading among younger people in offices and classrooms, causing more serious cases, overburdening hospitals and disrupting regular medical care. Testing remains insufficient despite calls for increased testing for new variants at elderly homes and for the young.

WHO IS AFFECTED?

The latest state of emergency covers Tokyo and the western metropolises of Osaka, Kyoto and Hyogo, home to about a quarter of Japan’s population of 126 million. The 17-day emergency begins Sunday and lasts until May 11, just after the end of Japan’s “golden week” holidays, to discourage traveling. The scheduled end, ahead of an expected visit to Japan of International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach in mid-May, has led to criticism that the government is putting the Olympic schedule over people's health.

WHAT CAN A STATE OF EMEGENCY DO?

Emergency measures were toughened under a law revised in February, and the state of emergency now allows prefectural governors in the areas to issue binding orders for businesses to shorten hours or close in exchange for daily compensation of up to 200,000 yen ($1,850), while imposing fines of up to 300,000 yen ($2,780) for violators.