Virginia lawmakers react to gun control laws

Just as federal lawmakers on both sides of the aisle set their differences aside to pass a bipartisan gun safety law, a tragic shooting happened at an Independence Day Parade in Illinois, killing seven people and injuring dozens more.

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Just as federal lawmakers on both sides of the aisle set their differences aside to pass a bipartisan gun safety law, a tragic shooting happened at an Independence Day Parade in Illinois, killing seven people and injuring dozens more.

Investigators said the person of interest had two previous run-ins with law enforcement in 2019. Shortly after, they said the suspect legally purchased five firearms.

Virginia Democratic Delegate Eileen Filler-Corn called the tragedy “devastating” during a visit to Roanoke on Wednesday.

The country’s new gun safety laws toughen background checks, fund school safety and mental health programs, and push states to enact red flag laws.

Filler-corn said more needs to be done.

“We can do so much more and we’ve got to prioritize this,” said Filler-Corn.

Republican Congressman Bob Good says Congress has no constitutional right to limit law-abiding citizens’ rights.

“The greatest deterrent to a bad person with a gun is more good people with guns,” said Good.

Ahead of the next January General Assembly session in Richmond, lawmakers like Republican Delegate Wren Williams and Democratic Senator Creigh Deeds said gun-rights bills will likely be introduced, but it’s unclear if any more will pass.

“We are not interested in any additional gun control laws,” said Williams. “The Second Amendment is very clear: shall not be infringed.”

“Unfortunately, in this country, we’re just not able to have mature discussions about firearms,” said Deeds.


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