Former IAAF head Lamine Diack sentenced to 2 years in prison

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FILE - Iin this Jan.13, 2020 file photo, former president of the IAAF (International Association of Athletics Federations) Lamine Diack arrives at the Paris courthouse, Monday, Jan. 13, 2020. A Paris court is delivering its verdict Wednesday Sept. 16, 2020, in the trial of Lamine Diack on corruption, money laundering and breach of trust charges against the one-time supremo of global track and field athletics, and according to prosecutors, creamed off millions for himself, with his son.(AP Photo/Thibault Camus, File)

PARIS – Former track federation president Lamine Diack was sentenced Wednesday to two years in prison for corruption during his nearly 16-year tenure at the IAAF, most notably a scheme that allowed Russian athletes who paid millions in hush money to keep competing when they should have been suspended for doping.

The guilty verdict in a Paris court represented a spectacular fall from grace for the 87-year-old Diack, who was the powerful head of the IAAF from 1999-2015 and mixed with world leaders and was influential in the world of Olympic sports. The court also sentenced Diack to another two years of suspended jail time and fined him 500,000 euros ($590,000).

His lawyers said they will appeal, keeping Diack out of jail for now. Diack did not comment as he walked out of court.

One of Diack's lawyers, Simon Ndiaye, called the verdict “unjust and inhuman" and said the court made his client a “scapegoat.”

Diack was found guilty of multiple corruption charges and of breach of trust but acquitted of a money laundering charge.

Among those in court, and thrilled by the verdict, was French marathon runner Christelle Daunay. She competed against one of the Russian athletes, runner Liliya Shobukhova, who later testified to investigators about illicit payments to hush up doping. Beaten by Shobukhova at the 2011 Chicago Marathon, Daunay was a civil party to the case.

Speaking after the court awarded her damages totaling 45,000 euros ($53,000), Daunay described the verdict as a victory for all athletes who were robbed of prizes and results by having to race against competitors who should have sanctioned but instead paid to benefit from the doping cover-up.

“Behind my mask, you can't see it, but I'm smiling,” she said. “I'm pleased, too, for all the athletes. We have to keep up the fight against doping.”