EXPLAINER: How does an officer use a gun instead of a Taser?

Police stand near a police cruiser after a rock was thrown at it in protest, Sunday, April 11, 2021, in Brooklyn Center, Minn. The family of Daunte Wright, 20, told a crowd that he was shot by police Sunday before getting back into his car and driving away, then crashing the vehicle several blocks away. The family said Wright was later pronounced dead. (AP Photo/Christian Monterrosa)
Police stand near a police cruiser after a rock was thrown at it in protest, Sunday, April 11, 2021, in Brooklyn Center, Minn. The family of Daunte Wright, 20, told a crowd that he was shot by police Sunday before getting back into his car and driving away, then crashing the vehicle several blocks away. The family said Wright was later pronounced dead. (AP Photo/Christian Monterrosa) (Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

A suburban Minneapolis police officer who fatally shot a Black man during a weekend traffic stop accidentally drew her firearm instead of a stun gun, the city's police chief said Monday. Although rare, a string of similar incidents has happened in recent years across the U.S.

Brooklyn Center Police Chief Tim Gannon said the officer — later identified as Kim Potter, a 26-year veteran who has been placed on administrative leave — had made a mistake in firing her gun at 20-year-old Daunte Wright, who later died. Video of the shooting taken from the officer's body camera includes audio of her saying “Holy (expletive)! I shot him," after firing a single round from her handgun.

Gannon said the officer's immediate distress showed her use of the gun was unintentional.

“As you can hear, the officer, while struggling with Mr. Wright yells ‘Taser! Taser!’ several times. That is part of the officer’s training prior to deploying a Taser, which is a less lethal device," Gannon said. “As I watch the video and listen to the officer’s commands, it is my belief that the officer had the intention to deploy their Taser, but instead shot Mr. Wright with a single bullet."

Some questions and answers about officers who mistakenly discharge firearms when they intended to draw and deploy stun guns:

HOW FREQUENTLY DOES THIS HAPPEN?

Experts agree this is a real but very rare occurrence that probably happens less than once a year nationwide. A 2012 article published in the monthly law journal of Americans for Effective Law Enforcement documented nine cases in which officers shot suspects with handguns when they said they meant to fire stun guns dating back to 2001.

WHY DOES IT HAPPEN?