Ex-police chief, 5 others charged in Capitol riot conspiracy

The U.S. Capitol is seen under dark skies in Washington, Tuesday, June 8, 2021, as barriers remain six months after the Jan. 6 attack. A Senate report examining security failures surrounding the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol blames missed intelligence, poor planning and multiple layers of bureaucracy for the deadly siege. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
The U.S. Capitol is seen under dark skies in Washington, Tuesday, June 8, 2021, as barriers remain six months after the Jan. 6 attack. A Senate report examining security failures surrounding the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol blames missed intelligence, poor planning and multiple layers of bureaucracy for the deadly siege. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) (Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved)

A former California police chief and five other men have been indicted on conspiracy charges in the Jan. 6 attack on the U.S. Capitol, according to court documents made public Thursday.

The men — four of whom prosecutors say identify as members of the Three Percenters antigovernment extremist movement — are accused of plotting with one another to block the certification of President Joe Biden’s victory.

Among those charged is a former La Habra police chief and founder of a far-right group called the American Phoenix Project, which was formed to protest pandemic-related restrictions and has helped pushed the lie that the election was stolen from former President Donald Trump.

In court documents, authorities describe how the group's founder, Alan Hostetter, in the weeks leading up to Jan. 6 called for violence against those who supported the results of the election. During a “Stop the Steal” rally held in Huntington Beach on Dec. 12, Hostetter warned that “Trump must be inaugurated on Jan. 20th."

“And he must be allowed to finish this historic job of cleaning out the corruption in the cesspool known as Washington D.C. The enemies and traitors of America both foreign and domestics must be held accountable. And they will. There must be long prison terms, while execution is the just punishment for the ringleaders of this coup," Hostetter said, according to the indictment.

Bilal Essayli, Hostetter’s lawyer, said his client surrendered to authorities.

A judge on Thursday allowed Hostetter to keep any guns he had inside his home after his attorney argued that the family had received death threats, and the judge set his bail at $20,000, the Orange County Register reported.

“From what I can tell in the indictment, my client is not accused of committing any violence,” Essayli said. “He did not enter the actual Capitol building, so we’re very troubled with the nature and the extent of the charges that are brought.”