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Hacker wreaks havoc over Virginia family through Ring security system

FILE - In this July 16, 2019, file photo, Ernie Field pushes the doorbell on his Ring doorbell camera at his home in Wolcott, Conn. Amazon says it has considered adding facial recognition technology to its Ring doorbell cameras. The company said in a letter released Tuesday, Nov. 19 by U.S. Sen. Ed Markey that facial recognition is a contemplated, but unreleased feature of its home security cameras. The Massachusetts Democrat wrote to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos in September raising privacy and civil liberty concerns about Rings video-sharing partnerships with hundreds of police departments around the country.   (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File)
FILE - In this July 16, 2019, file photo, Ernie Field pushes the doorbell on his Ring doorbell camera at his home in Wolcott, Conn. Amazon says it has considered adding facial recognition technology to its Ring doorbell cameras. The company said in a letter released Tuesday, Nov. 19 by U.S. Sen. Ed Markey that facial recognition is a contemplated, but unreleased feature of its home security cameras. The Massachusetts Democrat wrote to Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos in September raising privacy and civil liberty concerns about Rings video-sharing partnerships with hundreds of police departments around the country. (AP Photo/Jessica Hill, File) (Copyright 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved)

A rash of households have recently fallen victim to ring security system break-ins, and the privacy of your own home might not be as private as you think.

“Hello. Is someone here? Can you hear me?”

A stranger accesses a Virginia family’s Ring home security system.

The man then speaks to the family’s nanny who came downstairs after hearing his voice.

“Why is the door open? I’m in your house now.”

“Uh I opened it.”

“Look behind you.”

The hacker’s voice came from one of the Ring cameras inside the house.

“It gave me chills and anybody that I played it for said they felt chills up their spine," said Mackenzie Reed, the homeowner.

And this isn’t an isolated incident.

Other households had their Ring systems hacked, including this one in Washington state.

“Who is that?”

“I’m Santa Claus. Don’t you want to be my best friend?”

The family, who wanted to remain anonymous, contacted Ring for an explanation.

“It was accessed by a third party, they used a mobile device. They just told me that I had a lax password and they could’ve guessed my password," said the hacking victim, who wanted to remain anonymous.

The company recently issued a statement saying that they’ve investigated the issue and “have no evidence of an unauthorized intrusion or compromise of Ring’s systems or network.”

Ring also advises its users to enable two-factor authentication, add shared users, and use different and strong passwords.