Why Georgia is on the minds of many when it comes to runoff elections

Races on Tuesday will determine control of Senate

Family and supporters hold runoff signs as Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Rev. Raphael Warnock speaks during an Election Night event on November 3, 2020 in Atlanta, Georgia. Warnock is running in a special election on Jan. 5. against U.S. Sen. Kelly Loeffler. Photo by Jessica McGowan
Family and supporters hold runoff signs as Democratic U.S. Senate candidate Rev. Raphael Warnock speaks during an Election Night event on November 3, 2020 in Atlanta, Georgia. Warnock is running in a special election on Jan. 5. against U.S. Sen. Kelly Loeffler. Photo by Jessica McGowan (Getty Images)

The calendar may have switched to 2021, but that doesn’t mean all the focus in politics this month will be on the inauguration of president-elect Joe Biden.

Arguably more important is that the race for Senate control is still up in the air -- and is about to be decided Tuesday with two Senate seats in the state of Georgia up for grabs in runoff elections.

Here’s a breakdown of the two runoff elections.


What’s a runoff election?

Runoff elections are second elections held if no candidate reaches the necessary requirement of votes during the first election.

Only two states, Georgia and Louisiana, require candidates to receive a majority percentage of the vote in the general election. Every other state allows a candidate to win with the biggest plurality of the vote, even it doesn’t reach a required percentage.

Why is there a runoff election in Georgia?


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