Republicans ask why White House removed climate scientist

Meteorologists in the U.S. use temperature datasets spanning 30 years to calculate temperature normals. The U.S. normal annual temperature is now 53.3 degrees Fahrenheit.
Meteorologists in the U.S. use temperature datasets spanning 30 years to calculate temperature normals. The U.S. normal annual temperature is now 53.3 degrees Fahrenheit.

WASHINGTON – Two House Republicans are asking the White House for documents to explain why a scientist appointed by the Trump administration was removed from her post overseeing a government-wide report on climate change.

Betsy Weatherhead, a career scientist named in November to lead the sweeping National Climate Assessment, was reassigned last month to the U.S. Geological Survey, an Interior Department agency.

The White House declined to say why Weatherhead, a longtime University of Colorado climate scientist who also has worked in the private sector, was removed from her post.

Weatherhead was technically on loan to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy — which oversees the climate report — and is "returning to her home agency,'' the White House said. No reason was given, nor did officials say when a replacement will be named.

GOP Reps. James Comer of Kentucky and Ralph Norman of South Carolina called Weatherhead's removal suspicious, noting that she has decades of experience in climate science, in academia and the private sector. Whitehead worked at Jupiter Intelligence, a company that provides advice on managing climate change risks, before joining the White House.

“It appears the Biden administration is continuing to purge officials in the government based on their ties to the Trump administration,” they wrote.

Comer is the top Republican on the House Oversight Committee, while Norman is the senior Republican on the panel's environment subcommittee.

Comer and Norman also demanded records last month from the Environmental Protection Agency related to a decision by EPA Administrator Michael Regan to remove dozens of scientists and other experts from two key advisory boards.