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MAP: See where burn bans are currently in place across Central, Southwest Virginia

So far, seven cities/counties have banned open burning

A look at the wildfire on Pilot Mountain in North Carolina.

ROANOKE, Va. – Parts of Southside, including Danville, Halifax County and southern Charlotte County are in a ‘severe’ drought.

That’s not to mention other areas across the region that are experiencing dry conditions.

In light of those conditions, many areas have already begun enacting open burn bans as the dry conditions increase fire danger.

[Dry weather conditions fueling concerns for wildfires in Southwest Virginia]

Open burning is the burning of materials wherein products of combustion are emitted directly into the ambient air without passing through a stack or chimney from an enclosed chamber.

Below are the eight localities where burn bans are currently in place:

  • Amherst County - Its ban began December 3 and will remain in effect “until such time as conditions improve and it is determined the extreme fire danger has ended,” according to the county’s public safety department. The county’s announcement did not list a penalty for violators.
  • Carroll County - Its ban began on December 14 and will expire on Jan. 14, 2022.
  • Charlotte County - Its ban began December 2 at 6 p.m. The ban “will remain in effect until the area receives a significant amount of rainfall that decreases fire risk and an official notice that the burn ban is lifted is issued,” according to the county’s announcement. Violations of the ban may be punishable as a Class 3 misdemeanor, which carries a maximum fine of $500.
  • Danville - Its ban began on November 30. The ban will remain in effect, until conditions improve, according to the city. Violations of this ban are punishable as a Class 1 misdemeanor, which can be punishable by no more than a year in jail and/or a fine of up to $2,500.
  • Floyd County - Its ban began on December 16 and will last for 60 days, unless ended before that time. Violations of this ban are punishable as a Class 1 misdemeanor, which can be punishable by no more than a year in jail and/or a fine of up to $2,500.
  • Halifax County - Its ban began December 1 at 6 p.m. The ban will remain in effect, “until the area receives a significant amount of rainfall that decreases fire risk,” according to the ban announced by the county. This ban may be punishable as a Class 3 misdemeanor, which carries a maximum fine of $500.
  • Henry County - Its ban began on December 2. The ban will remain in effect until further notice. The announcement of the ban mentioned that violators could face criminal charges, it did not provide more specifics.
  • Pittsylvania County - Its ban began November 30 at 6 p.m. The ban “will remain in effect until the County receives a significant amount of rainfall that decreases fire risk, at which time the ban shall be lifted,” according to the announcement of the ban. Violations of this ban are punishable as a Class 1 misdemeanor, which can be punishable by no more than a year in jail and/or a fine of up to $2,500.

See the map below from the Virginia Department of Forestry:


About the Author:

Jeff Williamson arrived at WSLS 10 in March 2016.