EXPLAINER: When and where? How vaccines will roll out in US

FILE - In this Monday, July 27, 2020 file photo, a nurse prepares a syringe during a study of a possible COVID-19 vaccine, developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc., in Binghamton, N.Y. With coronavirus vaccines on the horizon, when and where will most Americans get their shots? Many of the details are still being worked out, as regulators review the first vaccine candidates. A federal panel of vaccine experts is meeting this week to consider Pfizer's vaccine, and again next week for Moderna's. (AP Photo/Hans Pennink)
FILE - In this Monday, July 27, 2020 file photo, a nurse prepares a syringe during a study of a possible COVID-19 vaccine, developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc., in Binghamton, N.Y. With coronavirus vaccines on the horizon, when and where will most Americans get their shots? Many of the details are still being worked out, as regulators review the first vaccine candidates. A federal panel of vaccine experts is meeting this week to consider Pfizer's vaccine, and again next week for Moderna's. (AP Photo/Hans Pennink) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved)

NEW YORK – With coronavirus vaccines on the horizon, when and where will most Americans get their shots?

Many of the details are still being worked out, as regulators review the first vaccine candidates. A federal panel of vaccine experts is meeting this week to consider Pfizer's vaccine, and again next week for Moderna's.

If the advisory group gives a thumbs-up, the Food and Drug Administration could green light the shots soon after, setting into motion the country’s largest ever vaccination effort.

It will take many months to reach everyone, and expect bumps in the road.

But don't get discouraged, said Dr. Marcus Plescia, chief medical officer for the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials.

"We will work through those,” he said.

WHEN CAN I GET VACCINATED?

It depends on your risk of getting infected or getting seriously ill. Are you a health care worker? A resident of a nursing home or getting long-term care? Those folks should be first in line for the initial, limited supply, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention decided.