Soldier charged after video of confrontation with Black man

This April 14, 2021, booking photo provided by the Richland County, S.C., detention center shows Jonathan Pentland, a U.S. Army staff sergeant charged with third-degree assault and battery after a video went viral depicting him accosting and shoving a Black man in a South Carolina neighborhood. (Alvin S. Glenn Detention Center via AP)
This April 14, 2021, booking photo provided by the Richland County, S.C., detention center shows Jonathan Pentland, a U.S. Army staff sergeant charged with third-degree assault and battery after a video went viral depicting him accosting and shoving a Black man in a South Carolina neighborhood. (Alvin S. Glenn Detention Center via AP)

COLUMBIA, S.C. – A white Army non-commissioned officer depicted in a viral video accosting and shoving a Black man in a South Carolina neighborhood has been charged with third-degree assault.

Jonathan Pentland, 42, was charged Wednesday and listed as detained in the Richland County jail and issued a personal recognizance bond, according to online jail records, which did not show him as having an attorney.

The video, posted Monday by a woman on Facebook and shared thousands of times, shows a man, identified as Pentland, demanding that a Black man leave the neighborhood before threatening him with physical violence.

“You’re in the wrong neighborhood,” Pentland, standing on the sidewalk, can be heard saying to the other man before using an expletive. “I ain't playing with you. ... I’m about to show you what I can do.”

According to Shirell Johnson, who posted the video, the incident happened in a subdivision of The Summit, which has a Columbia address but is technically outside the city's limits. The video does not show what started the conflict. Johnson did not immediately respond to a message from The Associated Press seeking further details.

The recording begins with Pentland, a U.S. Army sergeant first class, asking the Black man what he's doing in the area. The Black man says he was simply walking and not bothering anyone.

Throughout the three-minute video, Pentland continuously demands that the other man leave the neighborhood, getting in his face and, at one point, pushing the man, who almost falls to the ground.

“Let’s go, walk away," he said. “I’m about to do something to you. You better start walking right now.”