John Prine's wife urges Tennessee to expand absentee voting

FILE - In this Feb. 10, 2019 file photo, Fiona Whelan Prine, left, and John Prine arrive at the 61st annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles. The wife of the late celebrated singer-songwriter John Prine, who died from complications of COVID-19, is urging lawmakers to expand absentee voting so Tennesseans would not have to put their health at risk exercising their right to vote. Fiona Whelan Prine told a Senate panel Tuesday that allowing more people to cast an absentee ballot was critical in ensuring that people would remain safe and healthy during the 2020 election. Whelan Prine also contracted the coronavirus, but she has since recovered. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File)
FILE - In this Feb. 10, 2019 file photo, Fiona Whelan Prine, left, and John Prine arrive at the 61st annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles. The wife of the late celebrated singer-songwriter John Prine, who died from complications of COVID-19, is urging lawmakers to expand absentee voting so Tennesseans would not have to put their health at risk exercising their right to vote. Fiona Whelan Prine told a Senate panel Tuesday that allowing more people to cast an absentee ballot was critical in ensuring that people would remain safe and healthy during the 2020 election. Whelan Prine also contracted the coronavirus, but she has since recovered. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. – The wife of singer-songwriter John Prine, who died from complications of COVID-19, urged lawmakers Tuesday to expand absentee voting so Tennesseans would not have to put their health at risk to exercise their right to vote.

Fiona Whelan Prine, who also contracted the coronavirus and has since recovered, told a Senate panel that allowing more people to cast an absentee ballot is critical in ensuring that people would remain safe and healthy during the 2020 election.

“This is not nor should it be a partisan issue,” said Whelan Prine, who spoke over a video livestream and did not attend in person. “This is a serious health issue. And you, as our representatives, must advocate for our health, our safety and our right to participate in our Americana political process.”

Revered for his wise and witty lyrics, John Prine, 73, was known for such songs as “Angel from Montgomery,” “Sam Stone,” “Hello in There” and scores of other quirky original tunes.

Prine had survived throat and lung cancer, continuing to record and perform despite those illnesses.

“From March 26 until April 7, I waited at home for daily updates from the hospital as John lay alone, without me or our boys by his bedside as the virus ravaged his body,” Whelan Prine said. “I was given the opportunity to sit with him in the final hours of his life."

She said the virus had left her husband “unrecognizable" from the man she had left at the hospital emergency room 12 days earlier.

“I do not wish this pain and trauma on any other American family, especially not my fellow Tennesseans,” she added.