Lauding 'force' to restore order, Sen. Cotton raises profile

FILE - In this May 5, 2020, file photo Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., speaks during a Senate Intelligence Committee nomination hearing for Rep. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Cotton has risen to the ranks of potential 2024 Republican presidential contenders by making all the right enemies. Now, the Arkansas lawmaker is making more by lining up behind President Donald Trumps law and order recipe for controlling civic unrest (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, Pool, File)
FILE - In this May 5, 2020, file photo Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., speaks during a Senate Intelligence Committee nomination hearing for Rep. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Cotton has risen to the ranks of potential 2024 Republican presidential contenders by making all the right enemies. Now, the Arkansas lawmaker is making more by lining up behind President Donald Trumps law and order recipe for controlling civic unrest (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, Pool, File) (Copyright 2020 The Associated Press. All rights reserved)

WASHINGTON

WASHINGTON (AP) — Freshman Sen. Tom Cotton has risen to the ranks of potential 2024 Republican presidential contenders by making all the right enemies. By lining up behind President Donald Trump’s law-and-order recipe for controlling civic unrest, he’s making even more.

“One thing above all else will restore order to our streets: an overwhelming show of force to disperse, detain and ultimately deter lawbreakers,” the 43-year-old Arkansan wrote this week in a New York Times opinion column.

That infuriated Democrats and liberals, whom his column thumped by calling protests rocking cities “carnivals for the thrill-seeking rich as well as other criminal elements.”

For good measure, Cotton lambasted the Times — a favorite conservative target — after it released a subsequent statement saying Cotton's essay did not meet its standards. Times employees had rebelled, expressing shame and anger about the piece.