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Richmond mayor to introduce ordinance to remove city’s Confederate monuments

Confedearte monuments along Monument Avenue would be removed

A statue of Confederate General Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, unveild in 1919, stands at the intersection of Monument Avenue and North Boulevard August 23, 2017 in Richmond, Virginia. Richmond Mayor Levar Stoney's Monument Avenue Commission -- composed of academics, historians and community leaders --will include an examination of the removal or relocation of some or all of the city's Confederate statues, which depict Civil War Gens. Robert E. Lee, J.E.B. Stuart and Stonewall Jackson; President of the Confederacy Jefferson Davis; and Confederate naval commander Matthew Fontaine Maury. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
A statue of Confederate General Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, unveild in 1919, stands at the intersection of Monument Avenue and North Boulevard August 23, 2017 in Richmond, Virginia. Richmond Mayor Levar Stoney's Monument Avenue Commission -- composed of academics, historians and community leaders --will include an examination of the removal or relocation of some or all of the city's Confederate statues, which depict Civil War Gens. Robert E. Lee, J.E.B. Stuart and Stonewall Jackson; President of the Confederacy Jefferson Davis; and Confederate naval commander Matthew Fontaine Maury. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images) (2017 Getty Images)

RICHMOND, Va. – Richmond Mayor Levar Stoney announced plans to remove the other Confederate monuments along Monument Avenue, which include statues of Confederate President Jefferson Davis and Confederate Gens. Stonewall Jackson and J.E.B. Stuart.

Those statues sit on city land, unlike the statue of Robert E. Lee, which is on state property. Gov. Ralph Northam is expected to announce plans to remove the Lee statue on Thursday.

Stoney said he would introduce an ordinance July 1 to have the statues removed.

Senate Bill 183 and House Bill 1537, which Northam signed earlier this year, overturn the state’s law regarding the removal of Confederate war memorials.

Starting July 1, localities gain the ability to remove, relocate, or contextualize the monuments in their communities.

“I appreciate the recommendations of the Monument Avenue Commission - those were the appropriate recommendations at the time. But times have changed, and removing these statues will allow the healing process to begin for so many Black Richmonders and Virginians,” Stoney said. “Richmond is no longer the Capital of the Confederacy - it is filled with diversity and love for all - and we need to demonstrate that.”