Nick Cannon apologizes to Jewish community for hurtful words

FILE - In this Dec. 10, 2018, file photo Nick Cannon poses for a portrait in New York. Cannon's hateful speech and anti-Semitic conspiracy theories led ViacomCBS to cut ties with the performer, the media giant said. ViacomCBS condemns bigotry of any kind and we categorically denounce all forms of anti-Semitism," the company said in a statement Tuesday, July 14, 2020. It is terminating its relationship with Cannon, ViacomCBS said. (Photo by Amy Sussman/Invision/AP, File)
FILE - In this Dec. 10, 2018, file photo Nick Cannon poses for a portrait in New York. Cannon's hateful speech and anti-Semitic conspiracy theories led ViacomCBS to cut ties with the performer, the media giant said. ViacomCBS condemns bigotry of any kind and we categorically denounce all forms of anti-Semitism," the company said in a statement Tuesday, July 14, 2020. It is terminating its relationship with Cannon, ViacomCBS said. (Photo by Amy Sussman/Invision/AP, File) (2018 Invision)

Nick Cannon apologized to the Jewish community late Wednesday for his “hurtful and divisive” words, a day after ViacomCBS severed ties with him for the remarks made on a podcast.

The Anti-Defamation league and some Jewish leaders had condemned what they called anti-Semitic theories expressed by Cannon and demanded the apology.

“First and foremost I extend my deepest and most sincere apologies to my Jewish sisters and brothers for the hurtful and divisive words that came out of my mouth during my interview with Richard Griffin,” Cannon said on his Twitter account.

“They reinforced the worst stereotypes of a proud and magnificent people and I feel ashamed of the uninformed and naïve place that these words came from. The video of this interview has since been removed.”

ViacomCBS cut ties with the TV host and producer Tuesday in response to his comments on a podcast where he discussed racial bias.

Rabbi Abraham Cooper, the Simon Wiesenthal Center’s associate dean, told The Associated Press that Cannon reached out to him Wednesday and during a 30-minute telephone conversation he apologized to the Jewish community and Cooper asked him to post it on social media.

“He started out the right way, he said the right things. Half an hour is a long time, and we'll probably meet tomorrow in the LA area,” Cooper said.

“He understood that the words and references that he thought were based on fact, turned out to be hateful propaganda and stereotypical rhetoric.”